Gene therapy

June 30, 2015

Gene therapy was the subject covered in the best video produced by students in the 2014-15 cohort of Medical Biochemists at the University of Leicester.

This is an excellent example of “whiteboard animation” – you don’t get such an effective result without significant planning. The video is wrong to say treatment of X-SCID was the first successful use; the first case involved Ashanti DeSilva, who had ADA-SCID. It does not include any coverage of genome editing methods, which are the most exciting new development in this area. Nevertheless, a very useful primer on the topic.

 

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VeriChips

August 28, 2014

VeriChips are radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) that have been under consideration for a range of medical and other uses.

This short video, produced by students at the University of Leicester, considers some of the science and ethics associated with this technology.


Legal Highs

August 28, 2014

This short video was produced by second year students at the University of Leicester (UK) as an assessed piece of work. Unusually effective use of a simple “talking head” approach, combined with some graphics using Videoscribe manages to convey some of the ethical issues associated with Legal highs (New Psychoactive Substances).

There IS one major error in the video – the four principles are autonomy, beneficence, justice and non-maleficence (NOT non-malevolence).


Cognitive Enhancement

August 28, 2014

This short video on cognitive enhancement was produced by second-year undergraduates at the University of Leicester. Through the use of role-play, and the ruminations of the central character “Dave”, they manage to capture many of the ethical issues associated with use of these compounds.


Direct to Consumer Genetic Testing

June 12, 2013
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics report about Personalised Healthcare includes consideration of DTC Genetic Testing

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics report about Personalised Healthcare includes consideration of DTC Genetic Testing

The fall in the cost of DNA sequencing has opened the door to providing an individual with genetic information on such issues as paternity and the risk of developing or passing on a particular genetic disease. Some services are available via formal channels, but there is also a burgeoning market in direct-to-consumer (DTC) sales of genetic information and the associated interpretation of that data.

This video, made by second year students at the University of Leicester, looks at some of the ethical issues arising from the availability of personal genetic data direct from commercial companies.

The following link offer more details about: Teaching resources using the Nuffield report on medical profiling

You may also be interested in the post Is there a gene for oversimplistic analysis? from our sister site Journal of the Left-handed Biochemist.


Healthcare Rationing

June 12, 2013

It is a sad reality of any publically-funded heath service that there is always more that could be done if only there were sufficient finances. This short video by Medical students at the University of Leicester, raises some of the different tensions facing those who need to make decisions about the allocation of resources.


Three-parent IVF and Mitochondrial Diseases

June 12, 2013
The report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics was produced in 2012

The report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics was produced in 2012

In the past year, two major reports have been published concerning the ethics of “three-parent IVF”, in which a donated egg would be used to overcome disease arising from the small amount of genetic material found within mitochondria, the energy factories of the cell.

The first report Novel techniques for the prevention of mitochondrial DNA disorders: an ethical review was produced by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics (June 2012) – see summary of key findings.

In March 2013 the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority published their Advice to Government on Mitochondria replacement.

Both reports were largely in favour of the development. For examples of arguments against the technique see, for example, this post by the Christian Medical Fellowship.

A short animated video on the topic has been produced by second year students at the University of Leicester.