Science Betrayed: Reflections on research misconduct

April 4, 2011

Dr Adam Rutherford looks into misconduct in scientific research

A pair of 30 minute documentaries Science Betrayed have recently aired on Radio 4 (UK). In these programmes, Dr Adam Rutherford, Nature journalist and science interpreter for the broader public, investigates the murky world of scientific misconduct.

In the first episode, Rutherford looks at some historical and recent examples of misconduct ranging from the Piltdown Man hoax through to the case of South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-Suk. He and his interviewees reflect on some of the pressures that lead researchers to fabricate data.

The second episode focuses more specifically on the case of Andrew Wakefield and the alleged link between MMR and autism. The programme includes an interview with Wakefield himself as well as investigative journalist Brian Deer who was pivotal in uncovering evidence of malpractice.

The episodes can both be accessed via the BBC website. At the time of writing the BBC iPlayer gives no mention of expiry date so I am hopeful these are resources that will be directly available for some while. It appears that there is also an abbreviated version (18 mins) of episode 1 (and presumably episode 2, once broadcast) on the Discovery site where it is actually downloadable as an mp3 podcast – thanks to Joe (comments, below) for this tip-off.


Science and Ethics of Drug Trials – Class Clips

July 21, 2008

The BBC’s Class Clips series does exactly what it says on the tin – the programmes are collections of short clips for use in classroom teaching. New in 2007, Class Clips programmes on a variety of subjects have since been transmitted overnight in the Learning Zone on BBC2 on several occasions and it looks like the website is gearing up to offer them via iPlayer, which will be a bonus in terms of availability (although, at the time of writing, the links are not yet active). The intended audience is advertised as Key Stage 3, but they could certainly be used with older students too.

The Biology section of Class Clips Science 2 is the most directly relevant for bioethics education since it includes two short sections on drug trials; one looks more at the procedures, the second at the ethics. However, if you are teaching at other times about modern medicine then don’t be put off by the physics-only sounding section on the electromagnetic spectrum – each of the clips on waves of different lengths (from gamma rays through to radiowaves) is looked at with explicit reference to their medical applications. Read the rest of this entry »