Incidental findings in biomedical research

June 16, 2015

Investigations such as genome sequencing and brain imaging have the potential to reveal details about the patient of research subject which were not the principal reason for the study. The ethical issues associated with such “incidental findings” is the subject of this short film, made by students at the University of Leicester.

The video was rated the third best produced by students in the 2014-15 cohort.

People interested in knowing more about the topic might also like to read:
Green et al. (2013) ACMG recommendations for reporting of incidental findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing Genetics in Medicine 15:565-574

Vernooji et al. (2007) Incidental Findings on Brain MRI in the General Population New England Journal of Medicine 357:1821-1828


Human Genome Project: 10 years on

July 1, 2010

The tenth anniversary of the announcement that the human genome had been  ‘completely’ sequenced, has led to a large number of programmes and publications reflecting upon the impact that this information is having upon biomedicine. On 24th June, Today, the flagship current affairs programme on UK Radio 4, included a very interesting interview with John Sulston and Francis Collins the men who, respectively, had headed up the UK and USA ends of the publicly-funded consortia. The interview (7 minutes) can be heard via this link, and a transcript can be found here.