Direct to Consumer Genetic Testing

June 12, 2013
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics report about Personalised Healthcare includes consideration of DTC Genetic Testing

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics report about Personalised Healthcare includes consideration of DTC Genetic Testing

The fall in the cost of DNA sequencing has opened the door to providing an individual with genetic information on such issues as paternity and the risk of developing or passing on a particular genetic disease. Some services are available via formal channels, but there is also a burgeoning market in direct-to-consumer (DTC) sales of genetic information and the associated interpretation of that data.

This video, made by second year students at the University of Leicester, looks at some of the ethical issues arising from the availability of personal genetic data direct from commercial companies.

The following link offer more details about: Teaching resources using the Nuffield report on medical profiling

You may also be interested in the post Is there a gene for oversimplistic analysis? from our sister site Journal of the Left-handed Biochemist.


Darwin’s Dangerous Idea – Born Equal? (BBC2)

March 25, 2009
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This episode of Darwin's Dangerous Idea can be viewed online via the BBC iPlayer until April7 2009.

In the three-part series, Darwin’s Dangerous Idea, broadcast on BBC2 to mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species, broadcaster Andrew Marr explores the impact of the theory of evolution by natural selection on science, politics and society.

While the first and third episodes, respectively entitled Body and Soul and Life and Death, explore the historical spread of Darwin’s theory and the way it can be employed within conservation and ecology, the second episode, Born Equal?, includes a short section (between 00:45:12 and 00:56:20) that could be used in bioethics teaching.

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A suitable donor? – Hollyoaks

January 23, 2008

I have to say from the outset that I am not usually a Hollyoaks fan and, as this post will show, I’m way off the pace as far as who’s who. However, turning on slightly early for the Channel 4 news on Tuesday 22nd January 2008 I happened to catch the end of that day’s episode of the Chester-based soap opera (TRILT code 007CA973) and was intrigued.  The storyline involved Charlie, a baby recently diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) and in need of a bone marrow transplant. The first clip I caught was the doctor informing Charlie’s ‘dad’ Jake Dean that a blood test revealed he was not a suitable donor for the baby – on the grounds that he was not, in fact, the boy’s biological father.

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Frankie, Nancy and Jake

Recognising the potential benefit of this clip for teaching about transplantation and/or genetic testing, I decided I ought to check my facts.  This, it turned out, is more complicated than I had anticipated. So (deep breath) the woman standing anxiously by the baby’s bedside is not Charlie’s mum, she is Nancy, Charlie’s aunt (no pun intended). Charlie’s mum Becca is dead, stabbed in prison by her cellmate.  She was in prison having been found guilty of engaging in a sexual relationship with Justin, who was underage at the time. Despite the relationship being consensual, Justin made false claims of coercion based on his anger at being dumped by Becca. Justin is now with Katy Fox, Jake and Nancy are in a relationship of their own (keep up!).  Knowing about Becca’s infidelity with Justin, Jake had ordered a paternity test in January 2007, but decided not to open it, choosing instead to remain in ignorance and bring up Charlie assuming that he was the biological father.  This latest turn in the story shows that he is not. Read the rest of this entry »