Drug Trials – The Dark Side

August 6, 2008
BBC Reporter Paul Kenyon - speaking to patients outside an Indian hospital

BBC Reporter Paul Kenyon – speaking to patients outside an Indian hospital

A documentary in BBC2’s This World strand, Drug Trials: The Dark Side investigated the murky world of clinical trials carried our in the developing world. Reporter Paul Kenyon travels to India in an attempt to uncover the actions of some of the world’s biggest drug companies. Through a series of interviews with both doctors and patients, it reveals some discrepancies with regards to clinical trial protocol. This raises five main ethical issues:

  • Patient recruitment onto drug trials
  • Informed consent
  • The trust between a doctor and their patient
  • The methodology implemented during a drug trial
  • The cost and accessibility of drugs in the developing world

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Science and Ethics of Drug Trials – Class Clips

July 21, 2008

The BBC’s Class Clips series does exactly what it says on the tin – the programmes are collections of short clips for use in classroom teaching. New in 2007, Class Clips programmes on a variety of subjects have since been transmitted overnight in the Learning Zone on BBC2 on several occasions and it looks like the website is gearing up to offer them via iPlayer, which will be a bonus in terms of availability (although, at the time of writing, the links are not yet active). The intended audience is advertised as Key Stage 3, but they could certainly be used with older students too.

The Biology section of Class Clips Science 2 is the most directly relevant for bioethics education since it includes two short sections on drug trials; one looks more at the procedures, the second at the ethics. However, if you are teaching at other times about modern medicine then don’t be put off by the physics-only sounding section on the electromagnetic spectrum – each of the clips on waves of different lengths (from gamma rays through to radiowaves) is looked at with explicit reference to their medical applications. Read the rest of this entry »


WIT: A window on tensions in clinical trials

June 12, 2008

(Warning: contains plot spoilers!) Adapted from Margaret Edson’s 1999 Pulitzer Prize winning play, Wit tells the tragic story of Professor Vivian Bearing (Emma Thompson). Vivian, a ruthless scholar of 17th Century English poetry, is diagnosed with advanced stage 4 metastatic ovarian cancer. Dr Harvey Kelekian (Christopher Lloyd), Vivian’s consultant physician and leading figure in this area of medical research, explains that the most effective treatment option she has is an aggressive experimental chemotherapy at the full dose.

Professor Vivian Bearing

 
Professor Vivian Bearing (Emma Thompson)  

She cautiously consents to the therapy and embarks on a degrading regime of eight cycles, which no other patient has completed before. With a fearless determination, Vivian does everything the doctors ask of her, and as such illustrates the central ethical issue observed in this film; the conflict of interest witnessed between clinical therapy and clinical research. Throughout, this is entangled with clinical incompetence, issues of informed consent, end of life decisions and Vivian’s frustration with the hospitals insensitive mechanistic approach to their patients, having been asked repeatedly “How are you feeling today?” (00:04:10 – 00:05:25) Read the rest of this entry »