Do you know a good film on…?

September 10, 2011
Scottish Council on Human Bioethics logo

The SCHB has developed a database of films with bioethical themes

At BioethicsBytes we are sometimes asked if we know a good movie or documentary on a particular ethical topic. On many occasions we do, but our strategy here has generally been only to list items when we are specifically recommending a clip or a certain use of a film, rather than producing an overall list.

I am delighted therefore that the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics has just released a resource where they have a longer list of potential films and TV programmes organised by theme. The list can be accessed via this link. Remember to check back here afterwards to see if we’ve discussed the film on more detail.


Doctor Who and Philosophy

May 26, 2011

Doctor Who and Philosophy is the 55th title in the Popular Culture and Philosophy series

The new series of Doctor Who is underwaythe sixth in the 21st Century reincarnation of the classic science fiction drama. The current two-parter The Rebel Flesh and The Almost People is raising some interesting ethical questions which I hope to discuss here in the near future. If you are interested in ethical and philosophical questions raised by the Timelord’s adventures you may be interested in Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the inside.

A recent addition to the Popular Culture and Philosophy series, this multi-author work has been edited by Courtland Lewis and Paula Smithka.  Topics covered include questions of personal identity, existence, science and ethics. My former colleague Bonnie Green and I have a chapter Ain’t we all the same? Underneath, ain’t we all kin? on the notion of species. This actually started life as a post here on Bioethicsbytes (see The Meaning of Humanity). I am delighted that the publishers have allowed us to include a pre-publication edition of our chapter in the Leicester Research Archive. It can therefore be accessed via this link. If you like the look of it, why not buy the book!


Private Practice: Acting ethically at the Wellness Center?

July 1, 2009

(Warning – contains plot spoilers!) Private Practice is a spin-off from Seattle hospital drama Grey’s Anatomy in which Dr Addison Montgomery (Kate Walsh) moves from Seattle Grace to join the staff of the Ocean Wellness Center in Los Angeles.

I have to admit that I tired of Grey’s Anatomy during Season 1 and although I was aware it has spawned another series I had no desire to watch. All this changed, however, following an excellent talk on the programme, given by Dublin Doctor Audrey Dillon at the 4th Postgraduate Bioethics Conference (Belfast, June 2009).

The writers of Private Practice, headed by Shonda Rhimes, have made a conscious decision to incorporate ethical issues into the storylines (see ‘Private Practice’ explores bioethics questions). This means, therefore, that the series may well throw up some interesting case studies as discussion starters.

At the time of writing, Living TV (UK) has just started transmission of Season 2 (see here for Episode guide). A Family Thing, the first programme of the series, was aired on 25th June 2009 (TRILT code 00FC042B). True to promise, it contained two subplots featuring ethical dilemmas.

Saviour siblings – a donor by design?

In the first (starting 7 minutes in), Molly and Eric Madison present at the clinic demanding that the staff deliver their baby daughter that day, despite the fact that she is only 27 weeks gestation. The girl, it transpires, has been conceived following Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis, to be a ‘saviour sibling’ for her older brother, Jason.  The boy has leukaemia and has had his own bone marrow wiped out in preparation for a transplant from a donor who has now fallen unwell with pneumonia. He is therefore immunocompromised and urgently needs umbilical stem cells courtesy of the new child.

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Holby City – Resource allocation UPDATE

March 30, 2009
The most recent episode of Holby City, Feet of Clay, is available to view of download on via the BBC iPlayer until March 17 2009.

The most recent episode of Holby City is available to view of download on via the BBC iPlayer.

Following on from the recent BioethicsBytes post Holby City – “If you can’t look after yourself, then why should we?” (published on January 21 2009; updated February 4th 2009), which concerned ethical issues in NHS resource allocation as highlighted by two episodes of the BBC1 drama Holby City, this update post covers events in more recent episodes of Holby City – including the denouement to the storyline, as depicted in Feet of Clay.

The storyline concerns the “zero tolerance” policy implemented by Head of Surgery, Dr Ric Griffin (Hugh Quarshie), who is refusing to authorise surgical procedures for patients whose lifestyle choices may have contributed to their illness. Previous posts have covered the instigation of this policy in the episode Just (first broadcast on BBC1 on January 20 2009, at 20.00; TRILT Identifier: 00D15A4E),  and the events and debates this creates between the characters in Tough Love (first broadcast on BBC1 on February 3 2009, at 20.00; TRILT Identifier: 00D8E505). This post notes relevant events in the subsequent episodes Trust, Truth and Mercy, and Take Her Breath Away, and the closure of the storyline in Feet of Clay.

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Holby City – “If you can’t…look after yourself, then why should we?”

January 21, 2009
Watch this episode via the BBC iPlayer (available until January 27th 2009)

Watch this episode via the BBC iPlayer (available until January 27th 2009)

The issue of resource allocation in the NHS has cropped up several times in recent programmes (see, for example, Dom’s on the Case regarding the “postcode lottery”. The present post examines the ethical issues implicit in a different aspect of resource allocation in healthcare: the potential for conflict between traditional medical ethics and core NHS values and increasingly prominent views of the individual as both responsible and accountable for their own health status. This tension came to the fore in Just, a recent episode of the BBC drama Holby City (first broadcast on BBC1 at 8.00pm on 20th January 2009), and is captured nicely in one particular quote from the programme in which surgeon Ric Griffin challenges his patient, an obese smoker, “if you can’t be bothered to look after yourself, then why should we?” (00:38:07)

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Fighting Talk (Doctors) – a duty to disclose?

July 24, 2008

(Warning: contains plot spoilers!) This is an old episode of the BBC’s daytime drama Doctors, centred on the Mill Health Centre, a fictional midlands clinic. The relevance is probably limited to clinical ethics training for medical students, but it’s great for that purpose so worthy of a quick note here.

In Fighting Talk (TRILT ID: 0059FD65, first broadcast on BBC1, 15th June 2006), Dr Greg Robinson is faced with a dilemma when local bully Darren Waters has beaten up geeky pupil Kevin Dobson on his way to school. What Darren doesn’t realise is that Kevin is HIV positive. When Darren presents at the clinic with a bleeding hand and then Kevin later comes in with cuts to his face, Dr Robinson realises there is a risk that the virus has been transferred from victim to bully. Does he have a duty to disclose the details to Darren and his family?

In truth, the episode is entirely focussed on this story, punctuated with snippets of longer term issues for those who work at the Mill Health Centre. One short section, however, conveys all that needs to be told as a case study for tutorial group discussion. In the section starting at 16:23 Dr Robinson visits Kevin and his mother trying to persuade them to let him tell Darren. Kevin’s HIV status is mentioned openly, it had only been hinted at in early clips. The scene runs onto 19:17, but is best stopped at 17:50 when Kevin’s mum puts her hand on his shoulder – the rest of the clip is window dressing.

For completeness, the clips in which the story unfolds are: 02:00-02:58 (the fight), 03:40-05:03 (mum patches Kevin up), 07:52-10:00 (bully goes to GP), 10:26-12:40 (Kevin goes to GP), 12:40-13:37 (Dr Robinson discusses what to do with colleague), 14:10-15:55 (Doctor visits Dobson family), 16:23-19:17 (HIV status discussed), 20:11-20:50 (Doctors discuss ethical duty), 20:50-21:10 (Kevin visits clinic to give consent), 21:37-23:38 (Dr Robinson tries to get Kevin’s mum to agree), 24:22-26:12 (Kevin persuades his mum).


The Family Man – playing God at the fertility clinic?

June 23, 2008

 
The Family Man – Dr Patrick Stowe  

(Warning: contains plot spoilers!) The Family Man is a three part BBC 1 drama centred on the successful (fictional) ‘Wishart Fertility Clinic’. The patriarch of the clinic is Dr Patrick Stowe (Trevor Eve) whom is driven by pursuit of better ways to help distressed couples have a child. The drama follows four couples facing a spectrum of fertility problems. In an attempt to fulfil their dreams, they turn to Dr Stowe to help find the answers. At times this tests the legal parameters of fertility treatment in the United Kingdom, and as such raises a whole raft of bioethical issues.

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