Whose cells are they anyway?

December 24, 2010

Rebecca Skloot's book has received critical and popular acclaim in 2010

In hundreds of research labs around the world, including within my own Department, scientists carry out experiments using a human cell line known as “HeLa”. Most cells die after a defined period of time, but mutations within the HeLa cells have allowed them to continue dividing outside of these normal contraints, and as such they are said to be “immortal”. The original tissue sample from which HeLa cells are derived was taken from the cancerous cervix of an African-American woman Henrietta Lacks (the name of the cell line being an abbreviation of her name).

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, a captivating account of the human story behind these amazing cells, has recently won many plaudits, including the prestigious Wellcome Trust Book Prize.

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Live now: Bioethics in NewsFilm Online

July 8, 2010

Construction of Bioethics in NewsFilm Online was principally the work of final year undergraduate Sarah Curtis

There are growing collections of online videos suitable for teaching about bioethics. Amongst these, one of the less-known resources is NewsFilm Online (NFO), a collection of several thousand news stories, of which a very respectable number include bioethics-related material. To raise awareness of this footage, we have developed an additional website Bioethics in NewsFilm Online, where many of the clips are rated and reviewed.

Unfortunately access to some service on the main NFO website, including the ability to download news clips, is constrained to member institutions (mostly UK Universities) – if you think you could make valuable educational use of these materials but are unable to access NFO, we suggest you contact EDINA who manage that site.


The Daily Politics Show – “Should we be more wary of genetic screening?”

February 9, 2009
Watch this edition of The Daily Politics Show via BBC iPlayer (freely available until February 10th 2009)

The Daily Politics Show

The edition of The Daily Politics Show broadcast on BBC2 on February 3rd 2009 contained an item on the use of embryo screening during IVF (see 00:15:42 to 00:22:25). The section begins with a short explanatory VT, which covers the technique of prenatal genetic diagnosis – PGD – and its uses in IVF, and some of the main ethical positions. The programme’s hosts – Andew Neil and Sangita Myska – then discuss the ethical implications of genetic screening and embryo selection with Professor Robert Winston. This short post summaries the main bioethical arguments put forward in this 7 minute clip, and suggests how it may be used in teaching.

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BBC Radio 4 Today programme – Ethical issues in prenatal diagnosis and screening

January 22, 2009
Listen again via the BBC Radio 4's Today programme archive

Listen again via the BBC Radio 4's Today programme archive

This brief post concerns a short section of BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, broadcast on January 7th 2009. The clip itself is approximately 4.5 minutes long and features interviews with Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, of the Autism Research Centre, and Joy Delhanty, professor of human genetics at University College London, who prospectively discuss the ethical issues involved in prenatal testing for autism. It was broadcast alongside the corresponding edition of the BBC News’ weekly column Scrubbing Up, in which leading clinicians and experts give their perspectives on various issues in health and bioethics.

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